The Two Best Pieces of Modern Gear for Adventurers

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Back again for a late night writing session, 23:25L, A here, let’s do this:

“There’s no mountain I can’t climb, there’s no tower too high, No plane that I can’t learn how to fly, What do I gotta do to get through to you, To show you there ain’t nothin’ I can’t take this chainsaw to?” -Eminem

As I said in a previous post I’ve been out of action for a couple of days. Part of the illness was being unable to sleep all night, and laying awake, dead-tired all day.

I still wrote content, just did not publish it.

I did not have the clear mind required for editing purposes.

Why?

Because at this point in the game mediocrity can no longer be allowed to fly.

To be creative and write something, you require a clear mind that is bubbling with ideas like sparkling cider.

It needs to be vibrant and energized.

Moving on…

Topic of discussion for today:

The two essential pieces of gear for the Urban Explorer/Adventurer/Anybody Really


#1. The Mighty Pack

Some call it a backpack, but backpacks are for school children. Adventurers carefully arrange and place dialed in gear into a pack.

And then they live out of the pack for several days.

If they are able to resupply food and water, several weeks.

Now that’s money.

Packs come in all shapes and sizes, with a variety of features.

The function of a pack is to allow you to carry items without using your hands. Your hands are free to work, or swing as you walk.

A pack allows you to carry large loads comfortably.

For light loads, a pack is simply a cloth sack with two straps.

For a little more weight, the straps are padded, and the pack is made out of a stronger material.

Further increase the weight, and plastic and aluminum stays are added.

After that, a chest strap and a waist strap.

After that, it’s a matter of a proper fit, stronger stitching/fabric, and supporting webbing.

I’ve been through a lot of cheap packs over the years.

Some were hand-me-downs, some were from goodwill, some from walmart.

Wasn’t until a while ago, that I invested in a good pack.

Long overdue investment.

I currently own two packs, a small black day pack, and a large backpacking pack.

(See my entire list of gear here)

A pack is simply crucial.

I don’t know of any other way to carry items with the same amount of comfort.

Maybe side panniers on a bicycle could compete, but not for hiking/climbing.

Yes, investing in a good pack is worth it. One of the very few items I believe in splurging on.

The only downsides to using a pack can be sore shoulders from the straps, or a sweaty back in hot climates. Well worth the increased carrying capacity.

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#2. Rolling On Two Wheels

Bicycles are amazing. I am not saying this from some hippie point of view. Cars are great too, for some purposes, like traveling between cities and moving large items.

Bikes are light, fairly inexpensive(depends on how technical you get aka carbon fiber), and are infinitely easier than running, and much faster than walking.

For some purposes a bicycle is even better than a horse. It’s sure as hell cleaner and requires less care.

Walking is too damn slow for anything over 3 miles.

Unless your intention is serious introspection, walking 10miles+ is a waste of time.

Cycling will get you there faster, and develop the leg muscles more.

Running takes much more effort, especially if you are carrying gear.

Running isn’t too slow, it just requires constant focus, and a low burn effort to continue.

There were days that my bicycle was out of commission, and I would walk or run to work.

3.74 miles was the distance one way, some on road, some on trail.

Walking would take me between 40 minutes(good even stride, feeling well) to 60 minutes(tired, slow shuffle).

Running took me between 28 to 35 minutes.

Cycling never took that long, at any effort level.

15 minutes was a good time. 20 if I was tired.

It’s just more efficient.

You can coast on the bicycle due to the magic of the freewheel, and gear ratios are your friend.

You blast and you cruise.

If you’re dead-tired, you kick it into a low gear and spin quickly and lightly.

Eventually you just grind it out in a low gear.

Hey, at least you’re sitting down.

So a bike is a must have.


Now for using the two items for some adventure

So this is what it is ok:

For a night out in the woods, Walk and Think style, get yourself a pack and a bike.

Throw a plastic tarp sheet, a heavy wool blanket, some guy line, a fire-starter, some hotdogs, and a metal bottle with water and tea bags.

Don’t forget a good book, and your journal

Roll out into the woods via some back road.

Hop off the bike and walk it into the woods about a mile.

Post up you camp, deploy the tarp for rain protection.

It might rain, it might not. Use an open configuration if you think it wont, but deploy anyway, so you don’t wake up to get soaked.

Get a fire going!

  • Roast some hotdogs on the fire
  • Read a book, write in your journal
  • Boil some water in the metal bottle, make tea
  • Go to sleep wrapped up in wool blanket near fire for warmth

All there is to it, nothing to it but to do it.

All the Best.

-A

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